EVALUATION OF CARDIORRESPIRATORY FITNESS IN PATIENTS WITH LUNG CANCER SUBMITTED TO LUNG RESECTION SURGERY

Resumen:
Patients with lung cancer who undergo lung resection surgery, should undergo a range of evaluations prior to this. One of the fundamental elements is the knowledge of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), mostly measured as maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) or as peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak); being of great importance because of its relation with perioperative morbidity and mortality's risk of these patients, therefore, determinant in clinical decisions. The cardiopulmonar test (CPET) is the 'gold standard' for knowledge of CRF and the physiological state of the patient prior to surgery; being a valuable tool, wich allows to identify those patients who have less than 10 ml/kg/min who could have a higher risk of perioperative complications, as well as mortality. However, it's not considered a primary evaluation, and does not overcome spirometry and the oxygen diffusion test; thus it is a test that requires great implementation and resources, both human and economic. There are publications of another alternative for its evaluation, although still with limited evidence and without greater concordance for knowledge of the CRF, such as Stair Climbing Test (SCT) y Shuttle Walking Test (SWT) which are considered by clinical guidelines, even when these two main ones have limitations both in their internal assessment, as well as in protocols, and its importance as perioperative prognosis factor. We can find different alternatives, however, new studies that follow this research line are necessary, together with the use and generation of tests that create greater impact, in research area as well as in clinic.

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